Kinship Ties: Attachment Relationships that Promote Resilience in African American Adult Children of Alcoholics

J. Camille Hall

Abstract


For many African Americans, the extended family has been the source of strength, resilience, and survival. Although changes in African American families, like changes in all families in the United States that have diluted the importance of kinship ties, many African Americans continue to place a high value on extended family members. Children of Africans and communities of African descent traditionally interact with multiple caregivers, consisting of kin, and fictive kin.Utilizing both attachment theory and risk and resilience literature, this paper discusses ways to better understand the resilient nature of African American families and how multiple
attachment relationships assist at-risk African American children, specifically adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs).

Keywords


African-American, ACOAs, kinship tiesAfrican-American; ACOAs; kinship ties

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