Cultivando Respeto (Cultivating Respect): Engaging the Latino Community

  • Arcela Nuñez-Alvarez National Latino Research Center at California State University San Marcos
  • Marisol Clark-Ibáñez National Latino Research Center at California State University San Marcos
  • Ana M Ardón National Latino Research Center at California State University San Marcos
  • Amy L Ramos Grossmont Community College
  • Michelle Ramos Pellicia National Latino Research Center at California State University San Marcos
Keywords: civic engagement; immigrants; university; popular education; human rights

Abstract

This article addresses an innovative approach to connecting an urban university with the surrounding neighborhoods comprised of Latino immigrants, who represent potential new students or current students’ family members. The National Latino Research Center (NLRC) uses popular education, culturally informed, and linguistically relevant strategies to engage diverse Latino communities in the northern region of San Diego County in California. Methods of engaging the Latino community include cultivating long-term relationships, responding to time-sensitive community crises, facilitating inter-generational connections, presenting material in a culturally informed and relevant way, providing hands-on experiences with civic engagement, and growing partnerships within the university and among non-profits. Preliminary findings described a two-year study on civic engagement testing the effectiveness of a Spanish-language curriculum based on popular education offered (free) to members of urban and rural low-resourced Latino communities. The Center statistically correlated Latino community members’ experiential learning, participating in social media, and voting with gains in civic engagement knowledge.

Author Biographies

Arcela Nuñez-Alvarez, National Latino Research Center at California State University San Marcos

Research Director

Marisol Clark-Ibáñez, National Latino Research Center at California State University San Marcos

Faculty Director, Full Professor

Ana M Ardón, National Latino Research Center at California State University San Marcos

Researcher

Amy L Ramos, Grossmont Community College

Professor of Psychology

Michelle Ramos Pellicia, National Latino Research Center at California State University San Marcos

Research Associate

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Published
2018-05-23